President Obama Signs E-Label Act, Companies No Longer Required to Etch FCC Labels on Devices [iOS Blog]

by News on November 27, 2014, no comments

By Richard Padilla

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Earlier this year, U.S. Senators Deb Fischer (R-Neb.) and Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.) introduced the E-Label Act, which would allow for companies to meet the FCC’s demands for certification labels by placing digital stamps on a device’s software as opposed to etching information on hardware. The senators argued that the changes would allow manufacturers to save money and pass savings onto consumers. This was followed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) loosening its rules for labeling, stating that manufacturers could bypass etching FCC labels on their devices in favor of labeling by alternative means.

Now, The Hill reports that U.S. President Barack Obama has officially signed the E-Label act into law, which will now allow for companies like Apple to drop FCC labeling from their devices. Instead of being etched on hardware, it is likely that the required information will now be inside of a settings menu. However, it is also likely that the certification labels representing the European Commission (EC) and its Waste of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) initiative will still be seen on devices.

Verizon iPhone 4 without FCC logos on left, GSM iPhone 4 with FCC logos on right.
The slight design change could come to Apple’s lineup of devices for next year, although it remains unclear as to how exactly the company will take advantage of the new rules and regulations.

Read more here:: MacRumors

    

EFF Joins Amicus Brief in Support of Student Speech on Social Media

by News on November 27, 2014, no comments

By Sophia Cope

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This week EFF joined an amicus brief in support of a college student who was expelled from school for comments he made on Facebook.

Craig Keefe was a nursing student at a public college in Minnesota when he posted several comments on his Facebook profile expressing frustration about certain aspects of the nursing program, including what he considered to be favoritism of female students. Keefe also engaged in a dispute with one of his classmates, calling her a “stupid bitch.” While his Facebook profile was publicly viewable, he was off-campus when he posted his comments and did not use any school resources.

Keefe’s Facebook comments were brought to the attention of school administrators, who concluded that the comments constituted “behavior unbecoming of the profession and transgression of professional boundaries.”

Keefe sued the school administrators under 42 U.S.C. §1983, a federal statute that gives citizens a right to sue state government institutions or officials for violations of individual rights under the federal Constitution. He argued that the expulsion violated his free speech and due process rights under the First and Fourteenth Amendments. A federal trial judge in Minnesota disagreed and ruled in favor of the school administrators.

We joined the Student Press Law Center, American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, and the National Coalition Against Censorship in filing the amicus brief in support of Keefe in the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. The brief argues that the First Amendment protects Keefe because his comments, in part, related to matters of public concern, including alleged gender discrimination in the nursing program. The brief also highlights Supreme Court precedent that states that college students have greater free speech rights than minor students, and that off-campus speech receives greater protection than on-campus speech.

While courts across the country have been struggling with determining how much jurisdiction public school officials should have over the social media lives of students, we believe that Keefe’s case involves a clear violation of his constitutional rights.

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Read more here:: Electronic Frontier Foundation

    

How to de-authorize devices linked to your iTunes account

by News on November 27, 2014, no comments

By Allyson Kazmucha

Authorizing an iPhone, iPod, iPad, Mac, or PC on your iTunes account means you can uses it buy new apps, music, movies, TV Shows, and iBooks, re-download previous purchases, access iTunes Match and more. Because of licensing agreements, you can only have 10 devices total, and a maximum of 5 computers total, authorized on your iTunes account at any one time. Once you hit 10, you’ll have to remove an old device to add a new one. If you give away, sell, or lose a device, you might want to remove it as well. Luckily the process it fairly straightforward and can be done right from iTunes on any Mac or PC.

  1. Launch iTunes on your Mac or PC.
  2. Click on your name in the upper right hand corner of iTunes. In the menu, click on Account Info.
  3. Type in your iTunes password when prompted in order to continue.
  4. When your account loads, click on Manage Devices under the iTunes in the Cloud section.
  5. Click on Remove next to the devices you want to remove.

Read more here:: iMore

    

iMore show 432: Holiday gift guide

by News on November 27, 2014, no comments

By Rene Ritchie

The iMore show brings you everything you need to know about the week in iPhone, iPad, Mac, and Apple! On this episode Trying to pick the perfect Apple gift? We go over iPhones, iPads, Macs, and iPods, then dive into some of our personal favorites to help you get ready for Black Friday and the holidays! With Serenity Caldwell, Ally Kazmucha, Peter Cohen, and Rene Ritchie.

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Why next year’s GoPro videos could be the craziest you’ve ever seen

by News on November 26, 2014, no comments

By Brad Reed

2014 has been an amazing year for wild-and-crazy GoPro videos and it looks like 2015 could be even crazier. The Wall Street Journal reports that GoPro is working on a line of consumer drones that have GoPro cameras equipped and that would let GoPro fans take amazing aerial videos.

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Read more here:: BoyGeniusReport